Food Times Blog

Recipes that Delight

Traditional Italian couscous is the result of the country’s unique geographic position at the centre of the Mediterranean, an ideal place for cultural and culinary exchange dating back to the dawn of civilisation in the area. Some parts of Italy, most notably Trapani on the western tip of Sicily, are closer to North Africa than the rest of Europe, with an affinity noticeable in both architecture and the tastes that make up their regional cuisines.

There is even a festival dedicated to the local specialty in the Sicilian town of San Vito Lo Capo. Couscous was introduced to the Italian palate centuries ago, with early mentions of recipes reaching as far as Tuscany, but its popularity is currently booming due to its easy preparation, versatility in the kitchen and reputation as a healthy alternative to other traditional recipes. Use of couscous has become so widespread that some Italian food companies have even begun to launch cook and serve product lines to satisfy consumer demand.

A popular Italian recipe for couscous includes extra virgin olive oil, diced carrots, celery and bell peppers cooked with chicken or fish. Couscous is also perfect for vegetarians, who are able to add their favourite produce at will. Buon appetito! for your next happy hour, picnic or lunch by the sea.